Screening for Preeclampsia Update

In accordance with recommendations in standard of care set forth by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists; AWHA will no longer be performing urine dip stick screening on obstetrical patients.

Screening for Preeclampsia will take place in the form of routine blood pressure measurement and detailed medical history.

acog recommendation

Click Here To Download The ACOG Statement

Zika Virus Video Q&A

With Amy Roth - Clinical Manager at Academy Women's Healthcare Associates

What is the Zika Virus?

Zika Virus is a viral infection, primarily transmitted by Mosquito bites. Women can also be infected by unprotected male sexual partners who may have the infection.

Are there any Mosquito borne cases here in Colorado?

No, there are currently no infections from mosquito’s in Colorado.

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JustHers App for iPhone and iPad

The First Ever All-Inclusive App for Women

Pregnancy can be one of the most beautiful and wonderful things a woman experiences, but it can also be scary.

There are so many questions and worries!

Now, expectant moms have a new tool to help them understand and navigate through their pregnancies.

Academy Women’s Healthcare, the largest obgyn practice serving Southern Colorado, is proud to introduce the JustHers App for your iPhone and iPad.

JustHers App

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Opinion on Planned Home Births

Issued By The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

ABSTRACT: Although the Committee on Obstetric Practice believes that hospitals and birthing centers are the safest setting for birth, it respects the right of a woman to make a medically informed decision about delivery.

Women inquiring about planned home birth should be informed of its risks and benefits based on recent evidence. Specifically, they should be informed that although the absolute risk may be low, planned home birth is associated with a twofold to threefold increased risk of neonatal death when compared with planned hospital birth.

Importantly, women should be informed that the appropriate selection of candidates for home birth; the availability of a certified nurse–midwife, certified midwife, or physician practicing within an integrated and regulated health system; ready access to consultation; and assurance of safe and timely transport to nearby hospitals are critical to reducing perinatal mortality rates and achieving favorable home birth outcomes.

Click here to download the study (PDF)

January 20, 2011

Washington, DC — The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (The College) issued a Committee Opinion today that says although the absolute risk of planned home births is low, published medical evidence shows it does carry a two- to three-fold increase in the risk of newborn death compared with planned hospital births. A review of the data also found that planned home births among low risk women are associated with fewer medical interventions than planned hospital births.

“As physicians, we have an obligation to provide families with information about the risks, benefits, limitations and advantages concerning the different maternity care providers and birth settings,” said Richard N. Waldman, MD, president of The College. “It’s important to remember that home births don’t always go well, and the risk is higher if they are attended by inadequately trained attendants or in poorly selected patients with serious high-risk medical conditions such as hypertension, breech presentation, or prior cesarean deliveries.” Based on the available data, The College believes that hospitals and birthing centers are the safest place for labor and delivery.

Although The College does not support planned home births given the published medical data, it emphasizes that women who decide to deliver at home should be offered standard components of prenatal care, including Group B Strep screening and treatment, genetic screening, and HIV screening. It also is important for women thinking about a planned home birth to consider whether they are healthy and considered low-risk and to work with a Certified Nurse Midwife, Certified Midwife, or physician that practices in an integrated and regulated health system; have ready access to consultation; and have a plan for safe and quick transportation to a nearby hospital in the event of an emergency.

The recommendations state that a prior cesarean delivery is an absolute contraindication to planning a home birth due to the risks, including uterine rupture. Women who want to try for a vaginal birth after cesarean are advised to do so only in a hospital where emergency care is immediately available. Attempting a home birth also is not advised for women who are postterm (greater than 42 weeks gestation), carrying twins, or have a breech presentation because all carry a greater risk of perinatal death.

 

Committee Opinion #476, “Planned Home Birth,” is published in the February 2011 issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists is the nation’s leading group of physicians providing health care for women. As a private, voluntary, nonprofit membership organization of approximately 55,000 members, The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists strongly advocates for quality health care for women, maintains the highest standards of clinical practice and continuing education of its members, promotes patient education, and increases awareness among its members and the public of the changing issues facing women’s health care.